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Niles Dentists: Energy Drinks Are Bad For Teeth

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Many people believe energy drinks are useful consumable items that get them through the day. However, studies are suggesting that although energy drinks give people a short burst of productivity, they actually contribute to declining oral health.  Many people believe that an energy drink is a healthier alternative to soda and other sugary drinks. Specifically, the study shows that ingredients contained in sports drinks can damage tooth enamel which leads to increased risk of developing cavities.

The ABA led the research team, where 13 “sports” drinks (like gatorade) and 9 “energy” drinks (like Red Bull) were tested for their acidity. They tested six drinks for their effects on tooth enamel and found both types caused damage. Energy drinks, however, were twice as bad. Damaged tooth enamel cannot be fixed.  This study was published in the journal, General Dentistry.

The samples of enamel were immersed in the  test drinks for 15 minutes. The samples were then  to artificial saliva for two hours. This process was repeated four times a day for five days. The beverages were replaced with fresh ones every day. This process was developed in order to simulate real life, since people tend to consume these drinks throughout the day. The research shows that enamel loss was evident after five days of exposure!

If you’re an avid energy drink/sports drink user, then it would be wise to dilute the liquid with water in order to minimize the harmful effects to your teeth. Dr. Hagopian and Dr. Baghosian, Niles dentists, suggests discontinuing use of  these beverages as a source of energy and instead, make healthy changes to your sleeping and dietary habits. You’d be surprised to find out that little steps will make you feel healthier, refreshed, and less dependent on stimulants.

Niles dentists discuss flossing excuses

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Believe it or not, a recent survey has found that only 49% of Americans floss daily and 10% of Americans don’t floss at all. These rough estimates are quite unfortunate, given howimportant flossing is to your oral hygiene routine. In fact, dentists agree that flossing is more important than brushing in the fight against periodontal disease, which could ultimately lead to tooth loss. People joke about how the only time they floss is when they’re due for their annual check-up. Niles dentists, Dr. Baghosian and Dr. Hagopian, want their patients to know that he can tell if you’ve been a long-term flosser or not.

And, they want you to put an end to your excuses for not flossing regularly. The main “culprit” people cite for not flossing is that they don’t have time. Although effective flossing does require a bit of time (about 3 to 5 minutes), Dr. Lent says that even 60 seconds of flossing is better than zero seconds of flossing. The key here is to make flossing a daily habit.

Other excuses vary from not knowing how to floss, not having enough dexterity to floss, or having dental work that makes flossing impossible, or that food doesn’t get stuck in your teeth. If it’s lack of knowledge that is keeping you from flossing your teeth, take a look at this video that clearly illustrates how to properly floss. Also, if you have dexterity constraints, consider a floss holder. These disposable plastic Y-shaped devices (some equipped with a spool of floss) hold a span of floss between two prongs to allow one-handed use. Furthermore, flossing doesn’t rid your mouth of food detritus, it gets rid of dental plaque, the very thing that causes gum disease.

Another oft-used excuse is that flossing can be painful for some. Bleeding while brushing and flossing is the precise condition flossing aims to prevent. The good news is that once you regularly floss and brush, these symptoms subside. If they persist, it is wise to contact Dr. Hagopian or Baghosian at their Niles, IL office to figure out what is going on with your oral health. Remember, brushing and flossing regularly is how you prevent periodontal disease!

Niles Dentists Discuss Tooth Loss

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You may not be concerned with tooth loss now, but research suggests that there are certain factors that can contribute towards tooth loss. Those factors are:

  • Anyone over the age of 35 years of age
  • Males
  • Neglecting professional dental care
  • Neglecting proper oral hygiene practices (toothbrushing)
  • Smoking
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

A few of the above factors can not be changes — age and sex in particular — but the other risk factors can be influenced by your own healthy habits. For example, brushing and flossing regularly and seeing your dental health professionals, Niles dentists Dr. Hagopian or Dr. Baghosian, twice a year or as needed.

Main Reason For Tooth Loss

The primary reason for tooth loss was found be a to a result of sever periodontal disease (gum disease) that can be avoided or remedied with proper brushing and flossing techniques. Once gingivitis has taken hold of your gums and morphed into periodontal disease, the risk for tooth loss increases.

 

Tooth Loss and the Connection To Overall Health

In addition to poor oral health practices, people experiencing tooth loss also had health issues that complicated their dental health. The connection between tooth loss and diabetes has been well-established. In the research done on tooth loss in this particular, it was found people with high blood pressure and rheumatoid arthritis have a higher propensity to tooth loss and/or extraction.

 

If you have any of the health issues in the above list, or are concerned with tooth loss in general, be sure to care for your teeth as suggested by Niles dentists Doctors Baghosian or Hagopian, while also coming in for your professional dental cleanings and check-ups. If tooth loss can be prevented with simple steps, you’ll be thanking yourself for taking those tiny, albeit important measures.

Niles Dentists Discusses Electronic Toothbrushes

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When electronic toothbrushes first arrived in the dental healthcare market, there was only one brand offering automatic oral health care. These days, however, there are many different electronic toothbrushes available to consumers with different options — like re-chargeable batteries, smaller designs, and superb cleaning options. Because of this, it can be daunting when trying to figure out which electronic toothbrush is right for you.

Fortunately, Dr. Hagopian and Dr. Baghosian, Niles dentists, want to help guide you through the maze of modern electronic toothbrushes. First, let’s discuss the main difference between the two major electronic tooth brushes.

Electronic V. Sonic

Electronic toothbrushes are designed to mimic the motion of your hand when you brush your teeth with a regular toothbrush, except you get 3,000 to 7,500 rotations per minute. These toothbrushes do most of the work for you. Sonic toothbrushes dwarf regular electronic toothbrushes with 30,000 to 40,000 strokes per minute. The sonic toothbrushes rapid movements go a long way to remove plaque and ultimately, lead to an easy next check-up at Dr. Baghosian and Dr. Hagopian’s Niles office.

How You Reap The Benefits

Recent studies have shown that electronic and Sonic toothbrushes help alleviate plaque and gingivitis — reducing your risk of future gum disease as a result of gingivitis and eventually, periodontitis. Additionally, if you have any dexterity issues, having a toothbrush do the work for you, while also getting better than average results is another bonus. It might even influence users to brush more often, since there is less manual labor involved.

The only drawback associated with power toothbrushes is that they may be too expensive for some — ranging in price from $15 to $100. Some even break the $100 dollar price point.

What Your Niles Dentists Recommend

Since buying a power toothbrush can be a commitment of $100, Dr. Hagopian and Baghosian know how important it is to get the best one. As such, he advises his patients to ask their dental hygienist for their opinion on which electronic toothbrush is right for them during their next visit to our Niles, IL dental office.

Niles Dentists Discuss Gum Problems

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Gum disease poses a risk to your oral health and you may not even be aware of it — say Niles dentists Dr. Hagopian and Dr. Baghosian. If left untreated, gum disease can lead to serious tooth loss and other health complications. Before gum disease escalates to that point, it is possible to reverse the progression of the effects of gum disease.

Gingivitis and Periodontitis

You’ve probably heard of gingivitis, but have you heard of periodontitis? Gingivitis occurs when bacteria gets stuck in areas of the gum line, inflaming gums. Symptoms of gingivitis usually come in the form of continual bad breath and bleeding gums while brushing. Once gingivitis goes untreated, the disease transforms into periodontitis — reaching connective tissue and even the bone.

How Your Check-Up With HB Dentistry Helps

By the time patients even begin to notice the signs of gum disease, it’s usually too late. That’s why it’s important to see your dentist bi-annually, to ensure you’re not suffering from a severe case of gum disease. Dentists can spot problem areas along the gum line and any erosion around the root of the tooth. When you visit the dentist regularly, you begin to build up a history that allows the dentist to compare previous visits and x-rays, monitoring the progress or added erosion.

Preventing and Treating Gum Disease

Maintaining recommended dental hygiene habits is the first step in preventing gum disease. Most of us know the basics (brushing and flossing twice a day), but there are additional steps you can take:

  • Use an anti-bacterial mouthwash after brushing to wash away any “left-over” bacteria
  • Quit Smoking. Smoking damages gums, providing a habitable environment in which bacteria flourishes
  • Dr. Baghosian or Dr. Hagopian can scrape away plaque at the gumline

What To Do About Periodontitis

If gum disease has infected the bone, then more specialized care at home and the dentists office is required:

  • The first step is for a dentist to remove plaque and tartar from below the gum line. You may need a local anesthetic so you don’t feel pain.
  • Next, your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic to prevent infection. Some people, may need periodontal surgery to fold back gum tissue. Periodontal surgery can also treat deeper pockets of infection.
  • Your dentist or periodontist may need to do a procedure called grafting. For that, he takes tissue from one part of your mouth (such as the roof) to replace gum tissue that has eroded, exposing the roots of your teeth.

What Hurts, What Helps? Dental Tips from our Niles IL Dental Office

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Are you curious to what oral-health routines impact your life the most?  Here are some more tips from our Niles IL Dental Office.

The outer surface of teeth, called enamel, is designed to last a lifetime. “Enamel is the hardest substance in the body,” says dentist Leslie Seldin, DDS, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. Some wear and tear of tooth enamel is inevitable. But Seldin says there’s plenty you can do to keep your enamel strong. Start with these eight steps.

1. Limit Sugary Soft Drinks and Foods

Sugar leads to the production of acids in the mouth, which soften and eventually wear away at enamel. Chewy candies that stick on your teeth are particularly damaging. So are soft drinks. Along with sugar, soft drinks may contain citric acid and phosphoric acid, making them even more acidic. Artificially sweetened soft drinks are a smarter choice than sugary soft drinks. But sugarless sweeteners are acidic and may erode enamel over time. The best choice when you’re thirsty: a glass of water.

2. Help Yourself to Foods That Protect Enamel

Calcium in foods neutralizes acids in your mouth. Calcium is also an essential mineral needed to keep bones strong. Milk, cheese, and other dairy products all help protect and strengthen enamel, says Pamela L. Quinones, RDH, president of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association. Choose low-fat or fat-free dairy to help keep fat and calories to a minimum. If you frequently drink orange juice, O.J. with added calcium may be the best choice. Calcium buffers the normal acidity of orange and other citrus juices.

3. Avoid Over-brushing

Brushing too vigorously can wear down enamel. “Always use a soft brush and brush gently,” says Seldin. Hold the brush at about a 45-degree angle to your gums and move it back and forth in short strokes, about the distance of one tooth. Don’t brush immediately after eating sweets or citrus fruits. Acidic foods temporarily soften enamel and may make it more susceptible to damage from brushing. Wait for up to an hour after you eat, giving your enamel time to re-harden. Then brush your teeth.

4. Treat Heartburn and Eating Disorders

With severe heartburn, stomach acids may escape up into the esophagus. If those acids reach your mouth, they can erode enamel. The eating disorder bulimia, in which people vomit food after they eat, is another threat to enamel. If you have symptoms of heartburn or bulimia, talk to your doctor about treatment.

5. Beware of Chlorinated Pools

When swimming pools aren’t chlorinated properly, the water may become too acidic. Tooth enamel exposed to pool water can begin to erode. In a study by the Centers for Disease Control, 15% of frequent swimmers showed signs of enamel erosion, compared to only 3% of people who don’t swim. Check with the recreation center or gym where you swim to make sure the pool’s pH is checked regularly. While swimming, keep your mouth closed to avoid exposing your teeth to chlorinated water.

6. Be Alert to Dry Mouth

Saliva helps wash away food and bacteria that can lead to cavities. Saliva also neutralizes acidic foods. People with xerostomia, or very low salivary levels, often show signs of enamel erosion. Drink water often to keep your mouth clean and moist. If you exercise strenuously, be sure to rehydrate during and after your workout. Chewing sugarless gum or sucking on sugarless hard candy can stimulate saliva production. Some medical conditions and certain medications can cause dry mouth. If dry mouth persists, talk to your doctor.

7. Avoid Grinding Your Teeth

Some people grind their upper and lower teeth together, especially at night. “Over time, grinding can wear down the enamel surface and destroy teeth,” says dentist Richard Price, DMD, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association. “If you notice yourself clenching your jaw or grinding your teeth, talk to your dentist.” Custom-fitted tooth guards can help protect teeth from damage.

8. Get Regular Check-ups

To keep your enamel strong, see your dentist every six months for a check-up and teeth cleaning. Your dentist can spot signs of trouble, such as cavities or tooth grinding, before they do extensive damage to your enamel. Your dentist will also make sure that you’re getting the right amount of fluoride to protect your teeth. Fluoride hardens and protects tooth enamel. If your water supply is not fluoridated, ask your dentist if you need to take extra steps to protect your teeth. Your dentist may recommend fluoride supplements, mouthwashes, or coatings for your teeth.

Article Source: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/tooth-enamel-damage?page=1

If you live in the Niles area and are looking for a dentist, please visit our website for more information: http://www.hb-dentistry.com

Our Niles Dental office is located at:
9101 Greenwood Avenue, Suite 302
Niles, IL.  60714

Call us at  847-296-4030.
Follow us on twitter:  @hbdentistry

10 Toothbrushing Mistakes From Your Niles Dentist

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Toothbrushing is such an ingrained habit, few people think twice about it. But as with any habit, you can get sloppy, and that can lead to cavities and gum disease. Hear from your Niles dentist about the 10 toothbrushing mistakes you’re making. Continue reading:

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 1: Not Using the Right Toothbrush

Consider the size of your mouth when picking a toothbrush, says Richard H. Price, DMD, the consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. “If you are straining to open wide enough to let the brush in, the brush is probably too big,” he says.

”The handle has to be comfortable,” he says. It should feel as comfortable as holding a fork when you eat.

“The more comfortable it is in your mouth and your hand, then the more likely you will use it and use it properly,” he says.

Which is the better toothbrush: Electric or manual?

“It’s an individual preference,” says Michael Sesemann, DDS, president of the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry and an Omaha dentist.  “A person who brushes well with a manual will do as well as a person who brushes well with an electric.”

Price agrees. “It’s not the toothbrush, it’s the brusher.”

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 2: Not Picking the Right Bristles

Some toothbrushes have angled bristles, others straight. So is one type better? Dentists say no.

”It’s more related to technique than the way the bristles come out,” says Sesemann.

What is important when buying a toothbrush? Bristles that are too stiff can aggravate the gums. The ADA recommends a soft-bristled brush.

”Bristles should be sturdy enough to remove plaque but not hard enough to damage [the teeth] when used properly,” says Price. He doesn’t recommend “natural” bristles such as those made from animal hair or boar bristle.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 3: Not Brushing Often Enough or Long Enough

Softly brushing your teeth at least twice a day is recommended. ”Three times a day is best,” says Sesemann.

With too much time between brushings, he says, bacterial plaque will build up, boosting the risk of gum inflammation and other problems.

Brushing should last at least two minutes, says Sesemann. Three minutes is even better, says Price.

Most people fall short of both time lines, says Sesemann. “It’s an arbitrary number, but it’s just so people take the time to clean all the surfaces.” He often recommends people divide the mouth into quadrants and spend 30 seconds a quadrant. Some electric toothbrushes include built-in timers.

To make the two minutes go faster, Sesemann says he ”multitasks,” fitting in a little TV viewing as he brushes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 4: Brushing Too Often or Too Hard

While brushing your teeth three times a day is ideal, more may not be, says Sesemann. “More than four toothbrushings a day would begin to seem compulsive.”

Excessive brushing could expose the root of the tooth to irritation, and that could in turn irritate the gums. Brushing vigorously can also erode tooth enamel. The trick is to brush very gently for two to three minutes.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 5: Not Brushing Correctly

”Long horizontal strokes along the gumline can lead to abrasions,” says Sesemann. “Aim your bristles at the gum line at a 45-degree angle and do short strokes or vibrations.” Softly brush up and down your teeth, not across your teeth. The strokes should be vertical or circular, not horizontal.

Be sure to brush outer and inner tooth surfaces, the chewing surfaces, and your tongue.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 6: Starting in the Same Place Each Time

Many people start brushing the same part of their mouth over and over, dentists find.

“Start in a different place so that you don’t get lazy in the same area of your mouth,” says Price. He reasons that by the time you get to the last quadrant of your mouth, you’re bored with brushing.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 7: Skipping Inner Tooth Surfaces

Most people forget to brush the inner surfaces of teeth — the surface that your tongue presses against.

“The plaque you can’t see is just as important to remove as the plaque you can see,” says Price.

The most commonly skipped area, dentists say, is the inner surface of the lower front teeth.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 8: Not Following Up With a Rinse

Bacteria can grow on an un-rinsed toothbrush. Then, the next time you brush your teeth, you may actually put old bacteria back in your mouth, says Laurence Rifkin, DDS, a dentist in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rinsing the toothbrush after you brush will help remove any leftover toothpaste, too.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 9: Not Letting the Toothbrush Dry

“If you have a toothbrush that’s perpetually moist, it will cultivate more bacteria,” says Sesemann.

“If the bristles stay soggy, you can misshape them as you use the brush,” Price says. “Or it might be a breeding ground for bacteria.”

It’s a good idea to shake out the moisture, then recap it with a cap that allows air in, he says.

Toothbrushing Mistake No. 10: Not Changing the Toothbrush Often Enough

The American Dental Association recommends getting a new brush every three or four months, or even sooner if the bristles look frayed.

But rather than go by a strict timeline, Price says a visual inspection of the bristles is better. “Once the bristles lose their normal flexibility and start to break apart, change your toothbrush,” he says.

“Look more at the state of the bristles than the time period,” he says.

Some brushes have colored indicators that alert you when they need replacing, says Price.

Article Source: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=1

 

Check Out Your Niles Dentist’s YouTube video!

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Please take time to view you Niles dentist video on YouTube! This is one of many informative videos to come from Doctors Hagopian and Baghosian. If you are currently living in the Niles, IL area and are looking for a dentist, please do not hesitate to call our office for an appointment today.

 

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